Society Life April 2017 : Page 80

SL WhereLocalsGo PHOTOS BY LORRAINE HAAN-STEWART REVIEW BY FRANK GESLANI sushi zushi saké hour ............................................................................................................... Many have long considered Sushi Zushi their standby sushi spot in Southlake, but if you’re new to the area or haven’t been in awhile, you’ll want to book a table soon. Today’s Sushi Zushi may just be the best version of itself yet. The place still gives off a sleek, modern vibe from curvaceous booths and warm mini-malism, but somehow feels a little more lived-in. The menu is tighter, the experience more refined, their point of view more focused. Take their nigiri sushi, traditional slices of raw fish over vinegar-seasoned rice. You’ll find all your familiar favorites ably executed, but order them “razor style” and your same-old same-old sushi gets amped up with a hit of yuzu and paper thin slices of jalapeno, an extra dimen-sion of flavor to wake up your jaded palette. Some of those same flavors show up on the Cristina roll with spicy snapper, cilantro, yellowtail, yuzu, jalapeno and sriracha. If it reads a little Latin, that’s intentional. Sushi Zushi has a nuanced Latin-Asian soul at its core. Their motto “born in Japan, spiced in Mexico” grounds them with one foot firmly in North America. Sushi Zushi has quietly become one of the better operators in the con-temporary makizushi space, but we’d also encourage thinking outside of the roll. Try the tuna tower, its plump grains of sushi rice providing a lovely vehicle for the fish, four caviars and that savory Tampa Bay sauce. Mix it all up into a mound of pure comfort that showcases just how nimbly Sushi Zushi jumps from Japan to Latin America with flavor. brightened with cucumber, snow crab salad and a foursome of sweet, salty and spicy sauces. Makizushi, or rolled sushi, is an ideal medium for bucking tradition and marrying sometimes disparate cul-tures (very American traits if you ask me). The Cosimo roll is one. Yes, it’s tem-pura fried. Yes, it has cream cheese, avocado and tempura shrimp. And yes, it all reads a little more State Fair than sushi counter, but it works— and it’s one of the restaurant’s most popular dishes. Garnished with dollops of their signature Tampa Bay sauce, furikake (kind of like umami sprinkles) and eel sauce, it goes down dangerously easy. We also couldn’t stop eating the Bora Bora roll, similar to the Cosimo with shrimp tempura and cream cheese, but | Show up at lunch for bountiful bento boxes with a sampler of cooked and raw dishes, a relative bargain for how much food is in-cluded. There’s even a dedicated vegetarian, vegan and gluten free menu, a pleasant surprise for diners with alternative diets who may have otherwise avoided a sushi restaurant. To drink, we tried a small batch Saké from Japan, the Bunraku “Forgotten Japanese Spirit. This dry Saké with hints of melon and smoke stood up well to some of the food’s bold Latin touches. We also enjoyed an accessible Zushi Punch designed by a master mixologist. With de-lightful offerings like these—and an | (817) 310-3191 We sometimes forget that Sushi Zushi raised the bar when they opened in Southlake Town Square. Even with competition cropping up on every corner, it proves that you should never rule out a seasoned pro. Do yourself a favor—drop in, order an old favorite, add something new, wash them down with an ochoko of craft Saké and rekindle your passion for Sushi Zushi. intriguing Saké Hour menu to boot—the bar program makes a solid case for Sushi Zushi evolving into one of the better watering holes in town. 1420 E. Southlak e Blvd. Southlak e To w n Squar e | SushiZushi.com 80 APRIL 2017 | SocietyLifeMag.com

Where Locals Go

Frank Geslani

sushi zushi saké hour

Many have long considered Sushi Zushi their standby sushi spot i n Southlake, but if you’re new to the area or haven’t been in awhile, you’ll want to book a table soon. Today’s Sushi Zushi may just be the best version of itself yet. The place still gives off a sleek, modern vibe from curvaceous booths and warm minimalism, but somehow feels a little more lived-in. The menu is tighter, the experience more refined, their point of view more focused.

Take their nigiri sushi, traditional slices of raw fish over vinegar-seasoned rice. You’ll find all your familiar favorites ably executed, but order them “razor style” and your same-old same-old sushi gets amped up with a hit of yuzu and paper thin slices of jalapeno, an extra dimension of flavor to wake up your jaded palette. Some of those same flavors show up on the Cristina roll with spicy snapper, cilantro, yellowtail, yuzu, jalapeno and sriracha. If i t reads a little Latin, that’s intentional. Sushi Zushi has a nuanced Latin- Asian soul at its core. Their motto “born in Japan, spiced in Mexico” grounds them with one foot firmly in North America.

Makizushi, or rolled sushi, is an ideal medium for bucking tradition and marrying sometimes disparate cultures (very American traits if you ask me). The Cosimo roll is one. Yes, it’s tempura fried. Yes, it has cream cheese, avocado and tempura shrimp. And yes, it all reads a little more State Fair than sushi counter, but it works— and it’s one of the restaurant’s most popular dishes. Garnished with dollops of their signature Tampa Bay sauce, furikake (kind of like umami sprinkles) and eel sauce, it goes down dangerously easy. We also couldn’t stop eating the Bora Bora roll, similar to the Cosimo with shrimp tempura and cream cheese, but brightened with cucumber, snow crab salad and a foursome of sweet, salty and spicy sauces.

Sushi Zushi has quietly become one of the better operators in the contemporary makizushi space, but we’d also encourage thinking outside of the roll. Try the tuna tower, its plump grains of sushi rice providing a lovely vehicle for the fish, four caviars and that savory Tampa Bay sauce. Mix it all up into a mound of pure comfort that showcases just how nimbly Sushi Zushi jumps from Japan to Latin America with flavor.

Show up at lunch for bountiful bento boxes with a sampler of cooked and raw dishes, a relative bargain for how much food is included. There’s even a dedicated vegetarian, vegan and gluten free menu, a pleasant surprise for diners with alternative diets who may have otherwise avoided a sushi restaurant.

To drink, we tried a small batch Saké from Japan, the Bunraku “Forgotten Japanese Spirit. This dry Saké with hints of melon and smoke stood up well to some of the food’s bold Latin touches. We also enjoyed an accessible Zushi Punch designed by a master mixologist. With delightful offerings like these—and an intriguing Saké Hour menu to boot—the bar program makes a solid case for Sushi Zushi evolving into one of the better watering holes in town.

We sometimes forget that Sushi Zushi raised the bar when they opened in Southlake Town Square. Even with competition cropping up on every corner, it proves that you should never rule out a seasoned pro. Do yourself a favor—drop in, order an old favorite, add something new, wash them down with an ochoko of craft Saké and rekindle your passion for Sushi Zushi.

Read the full article at http://omagdigital.com/article/Where+Locals+Go/2760411/399435/article.html.

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