Home Energy Home Performance Contractor's Guide to Energy Efficient Remodeling : Page 1

REMODELING PREF ACE PARDON Performance with ENERGY OUR DUST — Home STAR Is Undergoing Renovation– but We’re Open for Business by Ely Jacobsohn 2012 is shaping up to be a turning point in the home performance in-dustry. Thanks to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA, aka, The Stimulus), the past three years have helped home performance gain recognition in the home improvement industry. More and more state and local governments, utilities, retailers, manufacturers, and financial in-stitutions, as well as Congress, and not least of all, the White House, are talking about home performance. Our duty now is to en-gage the rest of America by integrating the home performance industry with the entire home improvement industry. Many of you know that DOE took over the managerial duties of the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) program from EPA last fall. EPA deserves a tremendous amount of credit for developing the program and foster-ing the home performance industry to the point where we are today. Without HPwES, it is unlikely that ARRA would have been able to move our industry forward with as much thrust in the private market, or ex-pand the infrastructure of the home per-formance industry as fast, as it has done. Now that DOE is managing the pro-gram, and since ARRA is ramping down, it is critical to reassess the HPwES program and consider changes to engage more of the private market. Only through this engage-ment can the home performance industry survive without public subsidies. It is time for those funds to be used to complement and bolster the industry, not sustain it. To that end, DOE will be looking to enhance HPwES to substantially increase consumer demand for home performance services, to establish clear and consistent expecta-tions regarding the work and workforce, and to facilitate pathways for homeowners and contractors to participate in HPwES. This Home Performance Contractor’s Guide will help you scale up your home performance business in tandem with re-modeling and home improvement projects. This guide shows examples of successful programs you can learn from, such as ▪ home performance contractors in Long Island, New York, who are working with their HPwES sponsor and other stakeholders to grow the home perfor-mance market; ▪ the new synergy between the home performance and home improvement divisions of Portland, Oregon-based remodeler Neil Kelly Company, which allowed them to enter new markets and prove value to an entirely new range of homeowners; ▪ remodels that provide energy reduc-tions greater than 50% while making building enclosures more durable; ▪ deep energy retrofits that improve the performance of the home, the comfort of the occupants, and the stability of whole neighborhoods in Las Vegas, Nevada. This special compilation of Home Energy magazine articles, part of an ongoing series of Home Performance Contractor’s Guides, provides you with these success stories and other tools to cross-market and provide quality home improvement, remodeling, and home performance services to your market. As DOE works with industry to rede-fine HPwES, our shared goal is to figure out how to leverage private capital with public resources to increase homeowner demand for high-quality services that will improve the comfort and value of the home while reducing the amount of en-ergy wasted through inefficiency. Sound like a tall order? Let’s remember that these public-private partnerships have been suc-cessful in the past and continue to produce strong results today. This is how a few well-spent federal dollars in the ENERGY STAR program have leveraged billions in investments in products with the ENERGY STAR label. That is a success story we should emulate in the home performance industry. To continue to grow the home performance industry, we must aggres-sively engage and coordinate new partner-ships in the home improvement and home remodeling industries to reach our shared goal. Let’s take advantage of this oppor-tunity to evolve HPwES and make coura-geous, yet reasoned, decisions to enhance its effectiveness for the future. Ely Jacobsohn is the program manager for Home Performance with ENERGY STAR and works with the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program at the U.S. Department of Energy. >> learn more Learn more about the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program and Home Improvement Resources for Contractors at www.energystar.gov/ index.cfm?c=home_contractors. hm_improvement_contractors_resources. www. homeenergy.org 1

PARDON OUR DUST

Ely Jacobsohn

<br /> Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Is Undergoing Renovation– but We’re Open for Business<br /> <br /> 2012 is shaping up to be a turning point in the home performance industry. Thanks to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA, aka, The Stimulus), the past three years have helped home performance gain recognition in the home improvement industry. More and more state and local governments, utilities, retailers, manufacturers, and financial institutions, as well as Congress, and not least of all, the White House, are talking about home performance. Our duty now is to engage the rest of America by integrating the home performance industry with the entire home improvement industry.<br /> <br /> Many of you know that DOE took over the managerial duties of the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) program from EPA last fall. EPA deserves a tremendous amount of credit for developing the program and fostering the home performance industry to the point where we are today. Without HPwES, it is unlikely that ARRA would have been able to move our industry forward with as much thrust in the private market, or expand the infrastructure of the home performance industry as fast, as it has done.<br /> <br /> Now that DOE is managing the program, and since ARRA is ramping down, it is critical to reassess the HPwES program and consider changes to engage more of the private market. Only through this engagement can the home performance industry survive without public subsidies. It is time for those funds to be used to complement and bolster the industry, not sustain it. To that end, DOE will be looking to enhance HPwES to substantially increase consumer demand for home performance services, to establish clear and consistent expectations regarding the work and workforce, and to facilitate pathways for homeowners and contractors to participate in HPwES.<br /> <br /> This Home Performance Contractor’s Guide will help you scale up your home performance business in tandem with remodeling and home improvement projects. This guide shows examples of successful programs you can learn from, such as<br /> <br /> • home performance contractors in Long Island, New York, who are working with their HPwES sponsor and other stakeholders to grow the home performance market;<br /> <br /> • the new synergy between the home performance and home improvement divisions of Portland, Oregon-based remodeler Neil Kelly Company, which allowed them to enter new markets and prove value to an entirely new range of homeowners;<br /> <br /> • remodels that provide energy reductions greater than 50% while making building enclosures more durable;<br /> <br /> • deep energy retrofits that improve the performance of the home, the comfort of the occupants, and the stability of whole neighborhoods in Las Vegas, Nevada.<br /> <br /> This special compilation of Home Energy magazine articles, part of an ongoing series of Home Performance Contractor’s Guides, provides you with these success stories and other tools to cross-market and provide quality home improvement, remodeling, and home performance services to your market.<br /> <br /> As DOE works with industry to redefine HPwES, our shared goal is to figure out how to leverage private capital with public resources to increase homeowner demand for high-quality services that will improve the comfort and value of the home while reducing the amount of energy wasted through inefficiency. Sound like a tall order? Let’s remember that these public-private partnerships have been successful in the past and continue to produce strong results today. This is how a few well-spent federal dollars in the ENERGY STAR program have leveraged billions in investments in products with the ENERGY STAR label. That is a success story we should emulate in the home performance industry. To continue to grow the home performance industry, we must aggressively engage and coordinate new partnerships in the home improvement and home remodeling industries to reach our shared goal. Let’s take advantage of this opportunity to evolve HPwES and make courageous, yet reasoned, decisions to enhance its effectiveness for the future.<br /> <br /> Ely Jacobsohn is the program manager for Home Performance with ENERGY STAR and works with the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program at the U.S. Department of Energy.

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