Home Energy Performance Contractor 2013 : Page 1

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT GUIDE PREFACE Driving Home Performance by Ely Jacobsohn From Complexity to Simplicity O ne of our biggest chal-lenges in home perfor-mance (HP) is to generate consumer demand. HP is a complex service that takes time to explain, and often requires contractors to educate homeowners on the funda-mentals of energy and how we use it. In this compilation, you will read about a variety of strategies that will help you to successfully market and deliver HP to your customers. One way to simplify the complex-ity of HP programs is to develop structures and protocols that remove uncertainty from HP and enable all parties to manage risk. Currently, ef-diverse industry experts, will facili-tate the growth of a high-quality HP industry, and a skilled and cre-dentialed workforce, by developing standard work specifications and certification schemas. These complex efforts by regula-tors, program administrators, and contractors to promote understand-ing of the value of HP and energy efficiency, and to facilitate the stan-dardization of the HP workforce, will simplify the HP experience for home-owners. HPwES programs, savvy con-tractors and regulators will put these programs and standards to use in developing HP markets with low-risk industry. I encourage you to become aware of the programs below, and to stay engaged with DOE and with other stakeholders to ensure that your voice will be heard. In this way, you can influence the future growth of HP and your business. Ely Jacobsohn is the program manager for Home Performance with ENERGY STAR and works with the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program at the U.S. Department of Energy. >> learn more Building Performance Database: http:// www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/commer-cial/bpd.html. Standard Energy Efficiency Database Platform: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/ buildings/commercial/seed_platform.html. Uniform Methods Project: http://www1.eere. energy.gov/office_eere/de_ump.html. Investor Confidence Project:www.eeperfor-mance.org. HPXML: http://www.hpxmlonline.com/. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/wip/retro-fit_guidelines.html. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/ betterbuildings/neighborhoods/. Home Energy Score: http://homeener-gyscore.lbl.gov/. Building America: http://www1.eere.energy. gov/buildings/residential/ba_index.html. Home Performance with Energy Star: www.energystar.gov/hpwes. One way to simplify the complexity of HP programs is to develop structures and protocols that remove uncertainty from HP and enable all parties to manage risk. forts are under way to reduce the risk associated with the ways in which en-ergy savings are predicted and mea-sured (see Learn More). Industry leaders are also develop-ing tools that can be used to better pre-dict energy savings, for example, the Residential Investment Grade Resource Standard (RIGRS). DOE’s Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals proj-ect, which was accomplished through unprecedented collaboration among energy savings predictions, realizing reliable and verifiable energy savings through training and employing a highly qualified workforce. All par-ties involved will be able to speak the same language, play by similar rules, and understand the risks associated with their HP programs. Standardization of the HP work-force will enable the HP industry to grow to a scale comparable to that of the rest of the home improvement w w w. h o me e ner g y.o r g 1

DRIVING HOME PERFORMANCE

Ely Jacobsohn

<br /> From Complexity to Simplicity<br /> <br /> One of our biggest challenges in home performance (HP) is to generate consumer demand. HP is a complex service that takes time to explain, and often requires contractors to educate homeowners on the fundamentals of energy and how we use it. In this compilation, you will read about a variety of strategies that will help you to successfully market and deliver HP to your customers.<br /> <br /> One way to simplify the complexity of HP programs is to develop structures and protocols that remove uncertainty from HP and enable all parties to manage risk. Currently, efforts are under way to reduce the risk associated with the ways in which energy savings are predicted and measured (see Learn More).<br /> <br /> Industry leaders are also developing tools that can be used to better predict energy savings, for example, the Residential Investment Grade Resource Standard (RIGRS). DOE’s Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project, which was accomplished through unprecedented collaboration among diverse industry experts, will facilitate the growth of a high-quality HP industry, and a skilled and credentialed workforce, by developing standard work specifications and certification schemas.<br /> <br /> These complex efforts by regulators, program administrators, and contractors to promote understanding of the value of HP and energy efficiency, and to facilitate the standardization of the HP workforce, will simplify the HP experience for homeowners. HPwES programs, savvy contractors and regulators will put these programs and standards to use in developing HP markets with low-risk energy savings predictions, realizing reliable and verifiable energy savings through training and employing a highly qualified workforce. All parties involved will be able to speak the same language, play by similar rules, and understand the risks associated with their HP programs.<br /> <br /> Standardization of the HP workforce will enable the HP industry to grow to a scale comparable to that of the rest of the home improvement industry. I encourage you to become aware of the programs below, and to stay engaged with DOE and with other stakeholders to ensure that your voice will be heard. In this way, you can influence the future growth of HP and your business.

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