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Home Energy July August 2015 : Page 3

letters 1250 Addison Street, Suite 211B, Berkeley, CA 94702 (510)524-5405 contact@homeenergy.org www.homeenergy.org ________________ Revisiting “Revisiting electRification” Last issue’s editorial, “Revisiting Electrification” (May/June ’15, p. 2), received quite a bit of feedback on Home Energy Pros. We love a good discussion, so we wanted to share a sampling of the comments to keep the conversation going. “I work a lot with multifamily rehabs and I’m recommending elimination of all gas appliances inside of building envelopes. That seems the obvious first step. Heat pumps are getting better and better, especially for mild climates. As you point out, air sealing and insulation is key to reducing loads and becomes much easier without combustion appliances to worry about. I think the primary cause for failure of ‘whole house’ utility rebate programs is due to issues around combustion appliance safety.” Ben Thompson, Oakland, California “It’s not the source of the energy that's important—it’s the amount of energy used that matters. If you reduce your energy loads (whatever they may be) you will be generating less carbon emissions (wherever they may be produced). Without dramatically reducing energy loads (by mandating much more efficient structures in addition to appli-ances, transportation, and electronic devices) you just end up with an expensive switch from one form of energy to another with negligible carbon emission reduction.” David Eakin, Middletown, Pennsylvania “As we move toward more and more renewable energy in the grid, storage will be a key issue. The biggest challenge is providing renew-able energy in winter, when solar energy is lowest. Not coincidentally, that's also when heating demand is highest.” Graham Irwin, Fairfax, California “Similar to cars going all-electric, removing combustion appliances from homes is inevitable. A few thoughts: • Bringing the NACH down and reducing infiltration is significantly easier if there are no chimneys or other vents for combustion ap-pliances in the house. • Many combustion appliances are never properly commissioned, never adjusted for altitude, gas pressure, the CO dialed in, or serviced regularly, and therefore not running as efficiently as they could be. • Achieving net-zero is a lot easier with an all-electric home, as all you have to do is watch your meter to know if you're on the right track. No therm to kWh conversion. • If consumers were able to pick their electricity provider and decide what ‘pollution grade’ of electricity they buy, there would be real competition, and market transformation would happen more quickly.” Hans Joachim Preiss, Boulder, Colorado Senior Executive Editor Executive Editor Editor Associate Editor Design & Production Manager Design Associate Technical Editors Contributing Editor Copyeditor Alan Meier Iain Walker Jim Gunshinan Macie Melendez Diana Rosinus Leanne Maxwell Marcus Bianchi Steve Greenberg Courtney Moriarta Chris Stratton Larry Weingarten Steve Mann Irene Elmer Lieko Earle, Elizabeth Grant, Mike Knezovich, Bethany Sparn, Jason Todd, Eric Wilson Publisher Advertising Manager Office Manager Controller Sales & Marketing Associate Pro Bono Legal Services Tom White Maggie Forti Kurstin Anderson Jan Elkington Michael Goldstein Nixon Peabody LLP, Attorneys at Law Writers This Issue Home Energy requires all advertisers to provide documentation to support any claims of product efficiency and performance contained in ads. We welcome companies involved in residential conservation to join this select group. It includes manufacturers of conservation materials, tools, instrumentation, computer software, and efficient appliances, and providers of technical services, training, and labor. For advertising rates, contact: Maggie Forti, Tel: (510)524-5405 ext. 111, e-mail: mmforti@homeenergy.org. Home Energy is published by Energy Auditor & Retrofitter, Incorporated President, Alan Meier Executive Director, Tom White Advertising Board of Directors Francis Babineau Michael Blasnik David Canny Robert Knight Joseph Kuonen Maureen Mahle Alan Meier James Quazi Bill Spohn David Brown Chris Dorsi Laurel Elam Doug Garrett Theresa Gilbride Ron Judkoff Rick Karg Patricia Plympton John Porterfield A. Tamasin Sterner Greg Thomas Linda Wigington Edward Wyatt Larry Zarker Johns Manville Nest Labs Pacific Gas & Electric Bevilacqua-Knight, Incorporated CLEAResult Steven Winter Associates Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Consultant TruTech Tools Inspector Tools Habitat X RESNET Building Performance & Comfort, Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Residential Energy Dynamics, LLC Navigant eZing, Inc. Pure Energy Coach, LLC Performance Systems Development Linda M. Wigington Associates Energy & Materials Consultant Building Performance Institute Editorial Advisory Board Home Energy (ISSN 0896-9442) is a bimonthly publication of Energy Auditor and Retrofitter, Incorporated, 1250 Addison Street, Suite 211B, Berkeley, CA 94702. EA&R is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the dissemination of objective information on residential energy conservation. Yearly subscription rate: $85 for six issues. 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Printed on recycled paper share your opinion or comment on these ideas at www.homeenergypros.lbl.gov/profiles/blogs /revisiting-electrification. www. homeenergy.org 3

LETTERS

REVISITING “REVISITING ELECTRIFICATION”
Last issue’s editorial, “Revisiting Electrification” (May/June ’15, p. 2), received quite a bit of feedback on Home Energy Pros. We love a good discussion, so we wanted to share a sampling of the comments to keep the conversation going.

“I work a lot with multifamily rehabs and I’m recommending elimination of all gas appliances inside of building envelopes. That seems the obvious first step. Heat pumps are getting better and better, especially for mild climates. As you point out, air sealing and insulation is key to reducing loads and becomes much easier without combustion appliances to worry about. I think the primary cause for failure of ‘whole house’ utility rebate programs is due to issues around combustion appliance safety.”

Ben Thompson, Oakland, California

“It’s not the source of the energy that's important—it’s the amount of energy used that matters. If you reduce your energy loads (whatever they may be) you will be generating less carbon emissions (wherever they may be produced). Without dramatically reducing energy loads (by mandating much more efficient structures in addition to appliances, transportation, and electronic devices) you just end up with an expensive switch from one form of energy to another with negligible carbon emission reduction.”

David Eakin, Middletown, Pennsylvania

“As we move toward more and more renewable energy in the grid, storage will be a key issue. The biggest challenge is providing renewable energy in winter, when solar energy is lowest. Not coincidentally, that's also when heating demand is highest.”

Graham Irwin, Fairfax, California
“Similar to cars going all-electric, removing combustion appliances from homes is inevitable. A few thoughts:

• Bringing the NACH down and reducing infiltration is significantly easier if there are no chimneys or other vents for combustion appliances in the house.
• Many combustion appliances are never properly commissioned, never adjusted for altitude, gas pressure, the CO dialed in, or serviced regularly, and therefore not running as efficiently as they could be.
• Achieving net-zero is a lot easier with an all-electric home, as all you have to do is watch your meter to know if you're on the right track. No therm to kWh conversion.
• If consumers were able to pick their electricity provider and decide what ‘pollution grade’ of electricity they buy, there would be real competition, and market transformation would happen more quickly.”

Hans Joachim Preiss, Boulder, Colorado

Read the full article at http://omagdigital.com/article/LETTERS/2038388/263364/article.html.

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