Home Energy IAQ/Lead-Safe Guide 2011 : Page 1

Home Performance Contracting INTRODUCTION 4HE2IGHT)!14OOLSFOR (OME0ERFORMANCE Understanding IAQ and lead safety is like having the right tools when you need them. by Eric Werling, Ely Jacobsohn, and Darlene Watford H ave you ever been on a job where you didn’t have the right tool? Frustrating, right? It’s even worse if you don’t know what tools you need for a job. With training, experience, and the right tools in your toolbox, work goes smoothly and you can solve problems quickly. Understanding indoor air quality (IAQ) and lead safety, and how they relate to home performance, is like having the right tools when you need them. If you know how to diagnose or anticipate a mold problem, how to properly test combustion appli-ances for safe operation, and how to work lead safe—just to name a few of the most important IAQ is-sues—you can help your clients to a more energy-effi cient, healthier home. And you’ll be more confi -dent that the results of your work will be reliable and predictable—trouble-free energy savings and happy, comfort-able customers. An important new IAQ tool you need to know about is a set of practi-cal, voluntary protocols that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed to help home perfor-mance contracting and weatherization workers create safer and healthier in-door environments. EPA developed the Healthy Indoor Environment Protocols for Home Energy Upgrades in coordina-tion with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Workforce Guidelines for Home Energy Upgrades, and consistent with recommendations of the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Recovery Th rough Retrofi t report, issued in May 2010. EPA and DOE are working together to help a variety of programs adopt these new guidelines. Th ese pro-EPA LEAD-SAFE CERTIFICATION A required new IAQ tool New research shows that contractors, like plumbers, electricians, painters, and window replacement specialists, can inadvertently ex-pose children to harmful levels of lead from invisible dust disturbed during jobs they do every day. EPA issued a new rule in 2010 that requires most renovation and repair contractors working in pre-1978 homes, schools, and day care centers to become EPA certifi ed and trained in lead-safe work practices. For more information, go to www/epa.gov/getleadsafe. great IAQ tool for your home performance toolbox. It walks you through critical topics all home performance contractors need to understand—mold and moisture control, ventilation systems, com-bustion appliance testing, house pressure dynamics, lead-safe work practices, and more. You’ll learn from top experts in the fi eld about the most common IAQ problems related to home energy upgrades. Understanding, and knowing how to solve, these IAQ problems is critical to establishing customer trust, and to the success of your business. It can help you turn en-ergy effi ciency improvements into healthy-home improvements for your clients. How many of your customers care about health? Trick question—they all do! Read on. You need to have the right IAQ tools for the job. Eric Werling is national coordinator for EPA’s Indoor airPLUS Program and leader of healthy buildings guidance de-velopment at EPA. Ely Jacobsohn is an ac-count manager for DOE’s Better Buildings Program and coordinates residential en-ergy retrofi t activity for DOE’s Building Technologies Program. Darlene Watford is senior outreach coordinator for EPA’s Lead Renovation Outreach Program. grams include sponsors partnering with Home Performance with Energy Star, Better Buildings, and the Weatherization Assistance Program; as well as other home energy retrofi t programs that ad-dress changes to the building envelope or building systems. Together, these com-plementary voluntary guidelines and protocols will help home performance contractors, weatherization assistance programs, and building science trainers to improve work quality, promote health and safety, and reduce failures and call-backs. Th ey will also help drive consum-er demand for healthy energy effi ciency retrofi t services. Th is special “IAQ and Lead-Safe Guide” issue of Home Energy magazine is another >> For more information Read more about the EPA protocols and DOE guidelines at www.epa.gov/iaq/homes/ retrofi ts.html and www.weatherization.energy. gov/retrofi t_guidelines. www. homeenergy.org 1

The Right IAQ Tools For Home Performance

Eric Werling, Ely Jacobsohn, And Darlene Watford

Understanding IAQ and lead safety is like having the right tools when you need them.<br /> <br /> Have you ever been on a job where you didn’t have the right tool? Frustrating, right? It’s even worse if you don’t know what tools you need for a job. With training, experience, and the right tools in your toolbox, work goes smoothly and you can solve problems quickly. Understanding indoor air quality (IAQ) and lead safety, and how they relate to home performance, is like having the right tools when you need them. If you know how to diagnose or anticipate a mold problem, how to properly test combustion appliances for safe operation, and how to work lead safe—just to name a few of the most important IAQ issues— you can help your clients to a more energy-efficient, healthier home. And you’ll be more confi dent that the results of your work will be reliable and predictable—troublefree energy savings and happy, comfortable customers.<br /> <br /> An important new IAQ tool you need to know about is a set of practical, voluntary protocols that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed to help home performance contracting and weatherization workers create safer and healthier indoor environments. EPA developed the Healthy Indoor Environment Protocols for Home Energy Upgrades in coordination with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Workforce Guidelines for Home Energy Upgrades, and consistent with recommendations of the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ)<br /> <br /> Recovery Th rough Retrofi t report, issued in May 2010. EPA and DOE are working together to help a variety of programs adopt these new guidelines. Th ese programs Include sponsors partnering with Home Performance with Energy Star, Better Buildings, and the Weatherization Assistance Program; as well as other home energy retrofi t programs that address changes to the building envelope or building systems. Together, these complementary voluntary guidelines and protocols will help home performance contractors, weatherization assistance programs, and building science trainers to improve work quality, promote health and safety, and reduce failures and callbacks. Th ey will also help drive consumer demand for healthy energy efficiency retrofit services.<br /> <br /> Th is special “IAQ and Lead-Safe Guide” issue of Home Energy magazine is another Great IAQ tool for your home performance toolbox. It walks you through critical topics all home performance contractors need to understand—mold and moisture control, ventilation systems, combustion appliance testing, house pressure dynamics, lead-safe work practices, and more. You’ll learn from top experts in the field about the most common IAQ problems related to home energy upgrades. Understanding, and knowing how to solve, these IAQ problems is critical to establishing customer trust, and to the success of your business. It can help you turn energy efficiency improvements into healthy-home improvements for your clients. How many of your customers care about health? Trick question—they all do! Read on. You need to have the right IAQ tools for the job.<br /> <br /> Eric Werling is national coordinator for EPA’s Indoor air PLUS Program and leader of healthy buildings guidance development at EPA. Ely Jacobsohn is an account manager for DOE’s Better Buildings Program and coordinates residential energy retrofit activity for DOE’s Building Technologies Program. Darlene Watford is senior outreach coordinator for EPA’s Lead Renovation Outreach Program.

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